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Posts tagged 70s

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newyorker:

This year’s WFMU fund-raising marathon starts February 20th, and as an enticement, the station’s d.j. Michael Shelley has created a special tribute album in which contemporary rock and pop artists cover their favorite Top 40 hits from the seventies. All songs were recorded for the compilation only. It’s not available in stores, physical or digital. The only way to get it is to make a pledge to the station.

Click to listen to Yo La Tengo’s cover of Todd Rundgren’s “I Saw the Light.” For three more exclusive previews, Ben Greenman’s take on each, and the full album list: http://nyr.kr/y6gbq8

(Source: newyorker.com / The New Yorker)

Filed under Todd Rundgren WFMU fundraising tribute 70s music 1970s The New Yorker Yo La Tengo

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capitalnewyork:

RECOMMENDED: Tonight at Housing Works’ Bookstore Cafe, there will be a panel discussion on the mid-1970s music scene in New York City and Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever, featuring Will Hermes, DJ Kool Herc, Laurie Anderson, Lenny Kaye (guitarist with Patti Smith Group, author), Larry Harlow (Fania All-Stars), and Robert Christgau (“Dean of American Rock Critics”). It starts at 7 p.m.
Before you go, check out Chris Cafin’s interview with author Will Hermes on Capital: 

The triumph of rhythm is really the story that connects all these  genres. Punk was simplifying rock to very basic rhythms. The minimalists  were taking 12-tone compositions and reducing them to a pulse. Disco  was all about rhythm, obviously, hip-hop, salsa, and the loft jazz scene  to an extent.”

capitalnewyork:

RECOMMENDED: Tonight at Housing Works’ Bookstore Cafe, there will be a panel discussion on the mid-1970s music scene in New York City and Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever, featuring Will Hermes, DJ Kool Herc, Laurie Anderson, Lenny Kaye (guitarist with Patti Smith Group, author), Larry Harlow (Fania All-Stars), and Robert Christgau (“Dean of American Rock Critics”). It starts at 7 p.m.

Before you go, check out Chris Cafin’s interview with author Will Hermes on Capital:

The triumph of rhythm is really the story that connects all these genres. Punk was simplifying rock to very basic rhythms. The minimalists were taking 12-tone compositions and reducing them to a pulse. Disco was all about rhythm, obviously, hip-hop, salsa, and the loft jazz scene to an extent.”

Filed under NYC Big Apple books Housing Works New York music 70s